The Plains of Gor
Sleens
The People
Plants and Foods
The Warriors
Physical Traits

It is at night that the sleen hunts, that six-legged, long-bodied mammalian carnivore, almost as much a snake as an animal. I had never seen one,
but had seen the tracks of one seven years before.
I caught a strange, unpleasant scent, much like a common weasel or ferret, only stronger. In that instant every sense was alert.
I froze, an almost animal response.
I was silent, seeking the shelter of stillness and immobility. My head turned imperceptibly as I scanned the rocks and bushes about the road. I
thought I heard a slight sniffling, a grunt, a small doglike whine. Then nothing.
It too had frozen, probably sensing my presence. Most likely it was a sleen; hopefully a young one. I guessed it had not been hunting me or I
would not have been likely to have smelled it. Perhaps I stood thus for six or seven minutes. Then I saw it, on its six short legs, undulate across
the road, like a furred lizard, its pointed, whiskered snout swaying from side to side testing the wind. Outlaw of Gor, page 34

I had hardly moved another step when, in a flash of lightning, I saw the sleen, this time a fully grown animal, some nineteen or twenty feet long,
charging toward me, swiftly, noiselessly, its ears straight against its pointed head, its fur slick with rain, its fangs bared, its wide nocturnal eyes
bright with the lust of the kill.
A strange noise escaped me, an incredible laugh. It was a thing I could see, could feel, could fight!
With an eagerness and a lust that matched that of the beast itself, I rushed forward in the darkness and when I judged its leap I lunged forward
with the broad-headed spear of Gor. My arm felt wet and trapped, and was raked with fangs and I was spun as the animal squealed with rage and
pain and rolled on the road. I withdrew my arm from the weak, aimlessly snapping jaws.
Another flash of lightning and I saw the sleen on its belly chewing on the shaft of the spear, its wide nocturnal eyes unfocused and glazed. My arm
was bloody, but the blood was mostly that of the sleen. My arm had almost rammed itself down the throat of the animal following the spear I had
flung into its mouth. I moved my arm and fingers. I was unhurt.
In the next flash of lightning I saw the sleen was dead.
A shudder involuntarily shook me, though I do not know if this was due to the cold and the rain or the sight of the long, furred, lizardlike body that
lay at my feet. I tried to extract the spear but it was wedged between the ribs of the animal.
Coldly I took out my sword and hacked away the head of the beast and jerked the weapon free. Then, as sleen hunters do, for luck, and because
I was hungry, I took my sword and cut through the fur of the animal and ate the heart. Outlaw of Gor, page 36-37
The vicious, six-legged sleen, large-eyed, sinuous, mammalian but resembling a furred, serpentine lizard, was a reliable, indefatigable hunter. He
could follow a scent days old with ease, and then, perhaps hundreds of pasangs, and days, later, be unleashed for the sport of the hunters, to
tear his victim to pieces. Nomads of Gor, page 105

I did not want to be touched by the animals. I feared them terribly. One must have been fifteen feet in length, and the other close to twenty. I could
not have begun to put my arms about one. The leg just above the paw in the larger animal must have been some six inches in thickness. They
were leashed, the leashes going to rings on huge leather collars, four to five inches in width, an inch or two in thickness. I dreaded even that they
might rub against me, those huge bodies, with their glossy, oily fur. It was easy to see how men might not be able to control such beasts. Their
tongues lolled out now. They seemed passive enough, at the moment. Witness of Gor, page595

Two of the black-tunicked men cling to each leash. Again the black-tunicked men did not wish the pit guards present. Once again they had been
dismissed. Even with two men on a leash I did not think they would be able to hold the animals if they should be determined to go their own way.
But to be sure, these were hunting sleen, and not intended to hunt on the leash, but rather only when unleashed.
I cried out a little as one of the beasts brushed past me. I had felt its ribs, like iron bands beneath the smooth, rippling muscles, sheathed in the
oily pelt. Even in that brief, smooth touch I had sensed a considerable force, like a wave in the sea. But such beasts are not only powerful. They
are extremely agile as well, and can easily top a thirty-foot wall. Over a short distance they can outrun fleet game. Their front claws, used in
burrowing, can tear through heavy doors. Sometimes it takes ten spears to kill one. Witness of Gor, page 595

Sleen mating and birth

It mates once a year in the Gorean spring, and there are usually four young in each litter. The gestation period is some six months. The young
are commonly white furred at birth, the fur darkening by the following spring. Snow sleen, however, remain white-pelted throughout their life.
Most domestic sleen are bred. It is difficult to take and tame a wild sleen. Sometimes young sleen, following the killing of the mother, are dug out
of a burrow and raised. If they can be taken within the first two months of their life, which seems to be a critical period, before they have tasted
blood and meat in the wild, and made their own kills, there is apparently a reasonably good chance that they can be domesticated; otherwise,
generally not. Although grown, wild sleen have been caught and domesticated, this is rare. Even a sleen which has been taken young may revert.
These reversions can be extremely dangerous. They usually take place, as would be expected, in the spring, during the mating season. Male
sleen, in particular, can be extremely restless and vicious during this period. The mating of sleen is interesting. The female, if never before mated,
flees and fights the male. But he is larger and stronger. At last he takes her by the throat and throws her upon her back, interestingly, belly to
belly, beneath him. His fangs are upon her throat. She is at his mercy. She becomes docile and permits her penetration. Shortly, thereafter, their
heat growing, they begin, locked together by legs and teeth, to roll and squeal in their mating frenzy. It is a very fierce and marvelous spectacle. It
is not unusual for slave girls, seeing this, to kneel at their master’s feet and beg their caress. After the female sleen has been taken thusly
once, no longer need she be forced. She follows the male, often rubbing against him, and hunts with him. Sometimes she must be driven away
with snarls and bites. Sleen, interestingly, often pair for life.

Sleen calls

I was silent, seeking the shelter of stillness and immobility. My head turned imperceptibly as I scanned the rocks and bushes about the road. I
thought I heard a slight sniffling, a grunt, a small doglike whine.  Outlaw of Gor, page 34
With an eagerness and a lust that matched that of the beast itself, I rushed forward in the darkness and when I judged its leap I lunged forward
with the broad-headed spear of Gor. My arm felt wet and trapped, and was raked with fangs and I was spun as the animal squealed with rage and
pain and rolled on the road. I withdrew my arm from the weak, aimlessly snapping jaws. Outlaw of Gor, page 36
I threw myself into the cage on my hands and knees. I turned wildly and seized the bar and flung it down behind me. The snout of the beast thrust
viciously part way between the bars. It snarled, and squealed and hissed. Slavegirl of Gor, page 181
I looked to the left and right. It squealed hideously. It came closer. Slavegirl of Gor, page 184

The best trackers and hunters of Gor

Sometimes the foraging squads of the Kurii had been accompanied by trained sleen, often four of them. Twice, in my reconnoitring, I had had to
kill such beasts. The sleen have various uses; some are merely used as watch animals or guard animals; others are used as points in the
advance of squads, some trained to attack putative enemies, others to return to the squad, thus alerting it to the presence of a possible enemy;
others are even more highly trained, and are used to hunt humans; of the human-hunting sleen, some are trained merely to kill, and others to
hurry the quarry to a Kurii holding area; one type of sleen is trained to destroy males and herd females, distinguishing between the sexes by
scent. A sleen may bring a girl in, stumbling and weeping, from pasangs away, driving her, as Kurii take little notice, through their very camp, until
she is entered into a herd. Four days ago I had seen a girl drive, in which several sleen, fanning out over a large area of territory, had scented
out scattered, hiding slave girls and, from various points, driven them into a blind canyon, where a waiting Kur had swung shut a wooden gate on
them, fastening them inside. Sleen are also used to patrol the large return marches of groups of foraging expeditions, those marches between the
temporary holding areas and the main camp. The order of such a march is typically as follows: captured humans, in single file, form its center.
These humans are usually thralls and bond-maids, but not always. The spoils are carried by the captured male humans, unless there are too
many, and then the residue is divided among the bond-maids. Kurii burden the males heavily; they can think of little more than the weight they
carry, and the next step; furthermore, their wrists are usually tied to the straps of their improvised backpacks. Kurii, un-like Goreans, do not
subject bond-maids to heavy labor; it toughens their meat; the bond-maids are separated from the males, that they be deprived of leadership;
furthermore, the technique of keeping prisoners in single file, separating them by some feet, and preventing speech between them, tends to make
conjoint action between them unlikely. Prowling the long single-file of prisoners, male and female, in alternate groups, bond-maids thus used to
separate files of men from one another, will be sleen. Should any individual, either male or female, depart by so much as a yard from the line of
march, or attempt to close the gap between himself and a fellow prisoner, the sleen prevent this. Once I saw a girl stumble and two sleen,
immediately, snarling and hissing, sprang toward her. She leaped, weeping, to her feet and darted to her precise place in the line, keeping it
perfectly, casting terrified glances at the vicious predators. The line of prisoners and sleen is, on both sides, flanked by the Kurii foragers. There
are thus five lines, the center line of prisoners and spoils, its flanking lines of sleen, and, on either side, the flanking lines of the Kur foragers.
Human prisoners of Kurii, incidentally, are usually stripped; Kurii see no reason to give animals clothing. Marauders of Gor, page243, 244
Sleen are used for a multitude of purposes on Gor, but most commonly they are used for herding, tracking, guarding and patrolling. The verr and
the bosk are the most common animals herded; tabuk and slave girls are the most common animals tracked; the uses to which the sleen is put in
guarding and patrolling are innumerable; it is used to secure borders, to prowl walls and protect camps; it may run loose in the streets after
curfews; it may lurk in the halls of a great house after dark; it may deter thieves from entering locked shops; it may stand sentry upon wharves
and in warehouses; there are many such uses to which the sinuous beasts may be put; an interesting use which might be mentioned is prisoner
control; a tiny circle is drawn and the prisoner must kneel, or assume some prescribed position, within it; then, should the prisoner attempt to rise
to his feet, leave the circle, or break the position in the slightest, the beasts tears him to pieces. Aside from these common uses, sleen are put to
other uses, too. In Thentis, for example, sleen are used to smell out contraband, in the form of the unauthorized egress of the beans for black
wine from the Thentian territories. They are sometimes, too, used by assassins, though the caste of assassins itself, by their caste codes,
precludes their usage; the member of the caste of assassins must make his own kill; it is in their codes. Some sleen are used as bodyguards;
others are trained to kill in the arena; others perform in exhibitions and carnivals. There are many uses to which such animals are put. The
herding, tracking and control of beautiful slave girls is but one use. Slavegirl of Gor, page 186-187


As we passed among the wagons I leaped back as a tawny prairie sleen hurled itself against the bars of a sleen cage, reaching out for me with its
sic-clawed paw. There were four other prairie sleen in the cage, a small cage, and they were curling and moving about one another, restlessly,
like angry snakes. They would be released with the fan of darkness to roam the periphery of the herds, acting, as I have mentioned, as
shepherds and sentinels. They are also used if a slave escapes, for the sleen is an efficient, tireless, savage, almost infallible hunter, capable of
pursuing a scent, days old, for hundreds of pasangs until, perhaps a month later, it finds its victim and tears it to pieces. Nomads of Gor, page 28
“They are trailers or hunters?� asked the leader.
The distinction, in fact, is sometimes a subtle one, particularly if the beast’s bloodlust becomes aroused.
“Hunters,� said the pit master.
Sleen are trained variously. The five most common trainings are those of the war sleen, which may also be utilized as a bodyguard; the watch
sleen, to guard precincts; the herding sleen, which will kill only of given destination, usually a pen or slave cage; the trailing sleen, which is used,
in leash, to follow a scent; and the hunter, which is trained to hunt and kill. It is next to impossible to use a hunter as a trailer, because, when the
quarry is near, and the killing fever is on it, it will even turn and attack its leash holder, to free itself for the strike on the quarry. A trailer is usually
a smaller beast, and one more easily managed, but it is, when all is said and done, a sleen, and trailers not unoften, at the hunt’s end, their
instincts preponderating, break loose for the kill. When they begin to become unmanageable they must sometimes be killed. They hungers are
used generally, of course, in the pursuit of fugitives, free or slave. Unleashed, they are not retarded in their hunt by the lading of their keepers. I
was terrified of sleen. I had seen how they could tear apart great pieces of meat. Most houses in which female slaves may be found, it might be
mentioned, as it may be of interest to some, would not have sleen. The sleen is, at least in civilized areas, a rare, expensive and dangerous
beast. They do abound in some areas in the wild, as, for example, in the surrounding mountains. They sleen often burrows, and it is
predominantly nocturnal. There are also several varieties of the animal apparently, adapted to diverse environments. The most common sleen in
domestication, as I understand it, is the forest sleen. It is also the largest, animal for animal. There are also, as I understand it, prairie sleen,
mountain sleen and snow sleen. There is also a short haired variety, it seems, is adapted for an aquatic environment, the sea sleen. Witness of
Gor, page 575-576

“Loose the sleen,� said the leader of the strangers.
The heavy collars were removed from the throats of the two sleen. There is a difference in custom here with various sorts of sleen, which might be
remarked. War sleen, watch sleen, fighting sleen, and such, when freed, would normally retain the collars, which are often plated and spiked, for
the protection of the throat. With hunting sleen, on the other hand, the collars are usually removed. There are two views on this matter. One view
is that the collar might jeopardize the hunt, for example, that it might be caught in a branch, or be somehow utilized to restrain the animal before it
has located its quarry. The other is that the removal of the collar returns the beast to its state of natural savagery, that it removes from it any
inhibitions which might have resulted from its familiarity with human beings. Certainly it is difficult to recollar a hunting sleen until it has made its
kill, until it has been pacified, sated with the predesigned blood and meat. They two views, of course, are not mutually exclusive.  Witness of Gor,
page 596

“It is a simple “Scent-Hunt� command?�
“Yes.� Witness of Gor, page 598

“You cannot always depend upon sleen,� said the pit master.
“Hi, hi,� said the leader of the strangers, slapping his thigh calling the animals to him.
“Be careful,� said his lieutenant.
“Here,� said the leader of the strangers, crouching down, thrusting the blanket to the snouts of the beasts. “Here, take scent, take
scent.� The two animals, eagerly, tails lashing, thrust their snouts into the wadded blanket. Witness of Gor, page 598-599

Sleen in training

I threw myself into the cage on my hands and knees. I turned wildly and seized the bar and flung it down behind me. The snout of the beast thrust
viciously part way between the bars. It snarled, and squealed and hissed. I shrank back in the tiny cage. On the other side of the bars of the
vertically sliding, lowered gate the blazing eyes of the sleen regarded me. I cried out with misery. Had I run more slowly it would have caught me
and torn me to pieces. It turned its head and, with its double row of white fangs, bit at the bars. I heard the scraping of the teeth on the bars; it
pulled the cage, moving it, until it caught against the chain and stake which anchored it. Then it moved about the cage on its six legs, its long,
furred body angrily rubbing against the bars. It tried to reach me from another side. I knelt head down, shuddering, my hands over my head, in
the center of the tiny cage. Once its snout thrust against me, and I whimpered. I smelled its breath, felt the heat of it on my flesh. The bars were
wet where it had bit at them; the ground, too, about the cage was wet where the beast’s saliva, in its frenzy, its lust for killing, had dampened
the clawed dust.
“Back,� called Thurnus, coming to the sleen and putting a rope on its neck, dragging it away from the cage. “Gentle! Gentle, Fierce
One!� coaxed Thurnus. He thrust his head near the large, brown snout, cooing and clicking, his hands in the rope on its throat. He whispered
in its ear. The beast became pacified. Thurnus took a great piece of meat and threw it to the animal, which began to devour it.
“Excellent,� said Clitus Vitellius.
I knelt in the slave cage, my hands on its bars.
I had locked myself in the slave cage. When I had flung down the vertically sliding gate behind me, two notched projections, bolts, welded to the
flat bar at the gate’s bottom had slipped into iron-enclosed spring catches, heavy locks, one on the bottom left, one on the bottle right, the
gate being thus secured. I could not open these locks. They responded to a key, slung on the string about the neck of Thurnus. It is necessary to
engage the locks not only because the animal follows so closely and the gate must be swiftly lowered, but because if the locks are not engaged, it
will thrust its snout beneath the bottom of the gate, between the bottom of the gate and the floor of the cage, and, throwing its head up, fling up
the gate, and have access to the cage’s occupant. The girl’s choices are simple. Either she locks herself in the cage, imprisoning herself
helplessly at the pleasure of the cage owner, or the animal destroys her.
I, frightened, watched the sleen tear at the meat.
I knelt in the cage, my fists, white-knuckled, clenched on the bars. The cage is tiny, but stout. I could kneel in it, or crouch, or sit, with my legs
drawn up. I could not extend my body, nor stand upright. The roof of the cage was about the height of a man’s belt. It is so constructed that it
can be linked with other cages, or tiered. Though there is a wooden floor to the cage, the wood is placed over bars. The entire cage, thus, is
barred. The bars, and their fastenings, were heavy. The cage in which I had locked myself would hold not only a girl; it would also have easily and
efficiently held a strong man. It was, accordingly, an all-purpose slave cage.
I looked up through the bars. Clitus Vitellius did not look at me. Already I had been given to Thurnus.
The cage was in a sleen training pit, surrounded by a low, wooden wall and floored with sand. Within the walls were several individuals, my sisters
in bondage, those still the property of Clitus Vitellius, one of whom was encaged like myself, Chanda, who was sitting in her cage, wrapping a cloth
about her bleeding leg; Thurnus; another of his girls, Sandal Thong; some men assisting Thumus; and Clitus Vitellius, and some of his men.
Within the ring, too, were some eight sleen, tied on short tethers to stakes, at the sides; and a rack of meats, and poles, and ropes and whips,
used in the training of the animals. Outside the low walls, several individuals observed the proceedings, the balance of the men of Clitus Vitellius,
some villagers, including some peasant boys, and Melina, veiled, the slack, fat companion of the huge Thurnus.
Melina regarded me. I did not meet her eyes, but looked down, into the dust.
I was a pretty slave girl who had been given to her companion. I did not care to meet her eyes. I hoped she would not be cruel to me. But she was
of the peasants, and I was only a slave.
I looked across the sand to Chanda. She, too, was locked in a tiny cage. She sat on the boards, hunched over, her legs drawn up, and slowly
wrapped a piece of white cloth about her bleeding calf. The blood stained through the cloth. The bit of a garment that she wore had also been
torn by the beast who had pursued her. It, too, afterward had been fed. When it had been fed, it had been tethered with the others. The men
discussed the animals, and their merits.
I held the bars and, head down, eyes closed, pressed my forehead against the bars. What hope had a girl for escape on a world which contained
sleen?
I and Chanda had been used for purposes of demonstration.
Sleen had been dragged to us, to take our scent. We had been held by men while the animals had taken our scent. Then Chanda had been
released.
She had been run first. Then I had been released. I had been run shortly after her.
I had run wildly, in misery over having been given away by Clitus Vitellius. I had fully determined, in my hysteria and misery, to escape. What a
foolish slave girl I was!
I had run wildly. I had almost fainted when a brown, sinuous shape sped past me.
I saw it turn Chanda, and, snarling, begin its attack. She fled back toward the training pit. I saw her stumble once, and the beast seize her leg, and
she screamed, and then she was again on her feet, running, her hands extended before her. The girl either permits herself to be herded
expeditiously, swiftly, or she dies. I turned to flee. I screamed. It was there, in front of me. It lifted its head. I stumbled back, my hand flung before
my face. It snarled hideously. Distracted by the first sleen, that in pursuit of Chanda, I had not even seen this sleen, whose brain was alive with my
scent, circle me and approach.
“No! No!� I cried. “Go away! Please, go away!�
It crouched there, not five feet from me, its head lifted, hissing, snarling.
“Please, go away!� I Wept.
I saw its belly lower itself to the ground, the bead still lifted, watching me. Its tail lashed; its eyes blazed. It inched forward. It had two rows of fangs.
I looked to the left and right. It squealed hideously. It came closer.
It was a precisely trained beast, but no training is perfect. It is a balancing of instincts and conditioning. It is never perfect. The beast, at the
nearness and intensity of my scent, was becoming uncontrollable. The critical attacking distance for a sleen in the wild is about twenty feet. This
distance, in a herd sleen, of course, is much smaller. I could see its excitement mount. The fur about its neck rippled and bristled. Then I saw it
gather its four hind legs beneath it.
With a cry of misery I turned and fled. I ran back toward the training pit and the open cage that had been designated for occupancy by the Earth-
girl slave.
I ran wildly, helplessly. It ran behind me, snapping and snarling. I felt its breath on my legs. It cut with its teeth at my heels. I gasped. I fought for
breath. It drove me faster and faster.
The beast was well trained. It knew well how to herd a slave girl. It had a sense of the distance, and of my limitations; its speed and endurance
which, I suspect, were superior to my own. It had herded other girls. It kept me at my limits, not permitting me to think, but only to run, frenziedly,
madly, a driven, herded slave girl, seeking her cage.
I was at its mercy. It set me the pace which I must make, if I would live.
I cried out with misery, running.
It drove me perfectly.
My only hope of survival was to reach the cage, and lock myself within it, where I would await, confined, the pleasure of a master.
I threw myself into the cage on my `ands and knees and, wildly, turned and flung down the gate behind me, it securely locking. The beast tried to
reach me, but could not do so. I was safe within the cage, but locked within it, at the mercy of a master. I had been herded.
What hope had a girl for escape on a world which contained sleen? How completely we belonged to our masters!
There are many varieties of sleen, and most varieties can be, to one extent or another, domesticated. The two most common sorts of trained
sleen are the smaller, tawny prairie sleen, and the large, brown or black forest sleen, sometimes attaining a length of twenty feet. In the north, I
am told the snow sleen has been domesticated. The sleen is a dangerous and fairly common animal on Gor, which has adapted itself to a variety
of environments. There is even an aquatic variety, called the sea sleen, which is one of the swiftest and most dreaded beasts in the sea. Sea
sleen are found commonly in northern waters. They are common off the coast of Torvaldsland, and further north.
In the wild, the sleen is a burrowing, predominantly nocturnal animal. It is carnivorous. It is a tenacious hunter, and an indefatigable tracker. It will
attack almost anything, but its preferred prey is tabuk. It mates once a year in the Gorean spring, and there are usually four young in each litter.
The gestation period is some six months. The young are commonly white furred at birth, the fur darkening by the following spring. Snow sleen,
however, remain white-pelted
throughout their life.
Most domestic sleen are bred. It is difficult to take and tame a wild sleen. Sometimes young sleen, following the killing of the mother, are dug out
of a burrow and raised. If they can be taken within the first two months of their life, which seems to be a critical period, before they have tasted
blood and meat in the wild, and made their own kills, there is apparently a reasonably good chance that they can be domesticated; otherwise,
generally not. Although grown, wild sleen have been caught and domesticated, this is rare. Even a sleen which has been taken young may revert.
These reversions can be extremely dangerous. They usually take place, as would be expected, in the spring, during the mating season. Male
sleen, in particular, can be extremely restless and vicious during this period. The mating of sleen is interesting. The female, if never before mated,
flees and fights the male. But he is larger and stronger. At last he takes her by the throat and throws her upon her back, interestingly, belly to
belly, beneath him. His fangs are upon her throat. She is at his mercy. She becomes docile and permits her penetration. Shortly, thereafter, their
heat growing, they begin, locked together by legs and teeth, to roll and squeal in their mating frenzy. It is a very fierce and marvelous spectacle. It
is not unusual for slave girls, seeing this, to kneel at their master’s feet and beg their caress. After the female sleen has been taken thusly
once, no longer need she be forced. She follows the male, often rubbing against him, and hunts with him. Sometimes she must be driven away
with snarls and bites. Sleen, interestingly, often pair for life. Their rutting, however, is usually confined to the spring. Sometimes slave girls are
called she-sleen, but I do not think this expression is completely apt. Sexual congress in the human is not confined to a particular season. We are
not she-sleen. The heat of the she-sleen occurs in the spring. We are slave girls. Our masters keep us in heat constantly.
I looked across the sand to Chanda´s cage. She had finished wrapping the cloth about her cut calf.
I hoped the wound was not deep. No one seemed to be concerned about her. I gathered that her leg would not be scarred, and that her value
would not be lowered. If her leg did scar, with the result that her block value was diminished, it must be recalled that Clitus Vitellius, my former
master, had had her for nothing.
Sleen are used for a multitude of purposes on Gor, but most commonly they are used for herding, tracking, guarding and patrolling. The verr and
the bosk are the most common animals herded; tabuk and slave girls are the most common animals tracked; the uses to which the sleen is put in
guarding and patrolling are innumerable; it is used to secure borders, to prowl walls and protect camps; it may run loose in the streets after
curfews; it may lurk in the halls of a great house after dark; it may deter thieves from entering locked shops; it may stand sentry upon wharves
and in warehouses; there are many such uses to which the sinuous beasts may be put; an interesting use which might be mentioned is prisoner
control; a tiny circle is drawn and the prisoner must kneel, or assume some prescribed position, within it; then, should the prisoner attempt to rise
to his feet, leave the circle, or break the position in the slightest, the beasts tears him to pieces. Aside from these common uses, sleen are put to
other uses, too. In Thentis, for example, sleen are used to smell out contraband, in the form of the unauthorized egress of the beans for black
wine from the Thentian territories. They are sometimes, too, used by assassins, though the caste of assassins itself, by their caste codes,
precludes their usage; the member of the caste of assassins must make his own kill; it is in their codes. Some sleen are used as bodyguards;
others are trained to kill in the arena; others perform in exhibitions and carnivals. There are many uses to which such animals are put. The
herding, tracking and control of beautiful slave girls is but one use.
The gate to my cage was unlocked, and flung upward. The sleen outside had been fed and taken, by the men assisting Thurnus, on short ropes,
to their cages. The men of Clitus Vitellius had left the sand pit, and the area about it, accompanied by his girls, including Chanda, who, too, had
been released. The small crowd which had observed had now dissipated, with the exception of Melina, companion of Thurnus, and two or three
peasant boys, who watched me. Sandal Thong, one of the girls of Thurnus, who had assisted in the training pit, had left, too, now, to attend to
other duties, including the watering of the sleen. She wore a short slave tunic, white, of the wool of the Hurt, and a rope collar. She was a large,
long-armed, freckled girl, of peasant stock. Clitus Vitellius, in the tunic of the warrior, remained in the training pit, to accompany Thurnus back to
his hut. Slavegirl of Gor, page 181 to187

"Keep your legs apart," he said. "It is a gray sleen. I raised it from a whelp. Ah, greetings, Borko! How are you, old fellow!
I would have screamed and reared up, but I was thrust back, helpless, half strangled, scarcely able to utter a sound, to the step. So our masters
can control us by our collars. To my terror, then, pushing over my body, to thrust its great jaws and head, so large I could scarcely have put my
arms around them, into the hands and arms of my master, was an incredible beast. It had an extremely agile, active, sinuous body, as thick as a
drum, and perhaps fourteen or fifteen feet long. It might have weighed a thousand pounds. Its broad head was triangular, almost viperlike, but it
was furred. This thing was a mammal, or mammalian. Its eyes now had pupils like slits, like those of a cat in sunlight. So quickly then might its
adaptive mechanisms have functioned. About its muzzle were gray hairs, grayer than the silvered gray of its fur. It had six legs.
"Good lad!" said my master, roughly fondling that great, fierce head.
"We have been through much together, Borko and I," said my master. "He has even, twice, saved my life. Once when I was struck, unexpectedly,
by one foolishly thought to be a friend, the origin of this scar," he said, indicating good-humoredly the hideous, jagged tissue at the left side of his
face, "I told Borko to hunt. The fellow did not escape. Borko brought part of him back to me, in his jaws."

"Borko," he said, "is a seasoned hunting sleen. Even to strangers he would bring a hundred times what you would bring in the market."

"Learn slave," he said. "Learn slave."
I then began to whimper. "Hold still," said my master. The beast then began to push its nose and muzzle about me, thrusting it here and there,
about me. I now understood why I had been spread as I had, on the steps.
"The sleen," he said, "and especially the gray sleen, is Gor's finest tracker. It is a relentless, tenacious tracker. It can follow a scent that is weeks
old, for a thousand pasangs."
I whimpered, the beast's snout thrust between my thighs, sniffing.
"Please, Master," I whimpered.
I felt it nuzzling then at my waist and breasts. It was learning me.
"Do you know what the sleen hunts?" he asked.
"No, Master," I whimpered.
"In the wild it commonly hunts tabuk and wild tarsk," he said, "but it is an intelligent beast, and it can be trained to hunt anything."
"Yes, Master," I whimpered.
He held back my right arm, further, exposing more the armpit.
"Do you know what Borko is trained to hunt?" he asked.
"No, Master," I said.
I felt the snout of the beast then poking about my throat and under my chin, to the side, and then at the side of my neck. My maser then held my
left arm further, exposing the armpit to the beast.
"It is trained to hunt men, and slaves," he said.
Dancer of Gor, pg.160-161

Sea Sleen and hunting sea sleen

The head of a sleen, glistening, smooth emerged from the water. It was a medium-sized, adult sea sleen, some eight feet in length, some three to
four hundred pounds in weight. Beasts of Gor, page 280
I dropped the harpoon for it would be an extremely difficult cast to strike the animal head on. The bone point of the harpoon, thrown, would
probably not penetrate the skull and it would be difficult to strike the submerged, narrow forepart of the body knifing toward the kayak. I thrust the
lance point into the rushing, extended, double-fanged jaws and it penetrated through the side of the mouth, tearing, the animal’s face a yard
up the shaft. It reared six feet out of the water vertically beside the slender hide vessel. With two hands on the shaft I forced the twisting body to
fall away from the craft. One of the large flippers struck me, buffeting me, spinning me and the vessel about, the animal then slipping free of the
shaft of the lance. It circled the craft its mouth hot with blood flowing into the cold water. It was then I retrieved the harpoon again from the water
by its line, for it had been once more struck away from me. I set the light harpoon into the notch on the throwing board and, even mittened, an
instant before the beast turned toward me, grunted, snapping the throwing board forward and downward, speeding the shaft toward the enraged
animal. The bone head, vanishing, sunk into its withers and it snapped downward, diving, bubbles breaking up to the surface, and swift blood.
The line snapped out from its tray darting under the water. In moments the harpoon shaft and foreshaft bobbed to the surface, but the bone
harpoon head, its line taut, turning the head in the wound, held fast. I played the line as I could. The animal was an adult, large-sized broad-head.
It was some eighteen to twenty feet in length and perhaps a thousand pounds in weight. At the length of the line I feared the kayak and myself
would be drawn under the water. Imnak, too, came to the line, and, straining, together we held it. The two kayaks dipped, stems downward. â
€œHe is running,â€� said Imnak. He released the line. The kayak spun and then nosed forward. I held the line being towed by the beast
somewhere below the water. “Loose the line!� called Imnak. “He is running to the ice!� I saw a pan of ice ahead. “Loose the line!
� called Imnak. But I did not loose the line. I was determined not to lose the beast. I held the line in my left hand, wrapped about my wrist. With
the lance in my right hand I thrust against the pan of ice. Then the lance slipped on the ice and the line slipped to the side and I in the kayak was
dragged up on the ice skidding across it and then slipped loose of it and slid into the water to the side. “It is running to the sea!� called
Imnak, following me as he could in his own vessel. Then the line went slack. “It is turning,� said Imnak. “Beware!� But in a few
moments I saw the body of the sleen rise to the surface, rolling, buoyant. It was some sixty feet from the kayak. “It is not dead,� said Imnak.
“I know,� I said. It was easy to see the breath from its nostrils, like a spreading fog on the cold water. The water had a glistening, greasy
appearance, for it bad begun to freeze. It was dark about the animal, from the blood. We brought our kayaks in close, to finish the animal with our
lances. “Beware,â€� said Imnak. “It is not dead.â€� “It has lost much blood,â€� I said. “It is still alive,â€� he said. “Beware.â
€�
We nosed our kayaks on each side of the beast, approaching it from the rear.
“It is not breathing now,� I said.
“It has been hunted before,� said Imnak, “and lived.�
“It is dead,� I said. “It is not breathing.�
“It has been hunted before, and lived,� said Imnak. “Let us wait.�
We waited for a time. “Let us tow it home,� I said. “It is dead.�
I poked the beast with the tip of my lance. It did not respond, but moved inertly in the water.
“It is dead,� I said. “Let us draw it home now behind us.�
“I would not be eager to turn my back on him,� said Imnak.
“Why not?� I asked.
“He is not dead,� said Imnak.
“How can you be sure?� I asked.
“He is still bleeding,� said Imnak.
The hair rose on the back of my neck. Somewhere in that great body, apparently lifeless in the water, there still beat its heart.
“It is a broad-head.� said Imnak. “It is pretending.�
“It is losing blood,� I said. “Too, it must soon breathe.�
“Yes,� said Imnak. “It will soon make its move. Be ready.�
“We could go in with lances now,� I said.
“It is waiting for our closer approach,� said Imnak. “Do not think its senses are not keen.�
“We shall wait?� I asked.
“Yes,� said Imnak. “ Of course. It is bleeding. Time is on our side.�
We waited in the polar dusk.
After a time Imnak said, “Be ready. I have been counting. It must soon breathe.�
We readied our lances, one of us on each side of the beast. Suddenly with a great, exploding noise, expelling air, the sleen leaped upward. At the
height of its leap we struck it with our lances. It pulled free of the lances and, sucking in air, spun and dove. Again the harpoon line darted
downward. “We struck it fairly!� said Imnak. “Watch out!� he cried. The line had grown slack. I peered downward into the water.
Then I felt the swell of the water beneath me, clearly through the taut hide of the kayak. I thrust downward with the lance and was half pulled from
the kayak, myself and the vessel lifted upward, as the sleen´s impaled body reared up almost beneath the craft. Imnak struck again at it from the
side. It fell back in the water and I, jerking free the lance, thrust it again into the wet, bloody pelt. It attacked again, laterally in the water, fangs
snapping, and I pressed it away with the lance. Imnak struck it again. It thrashed; bloody in the icy water. It turned on Imnak and I thrust my lance
deeply into its side, behind the right foreflipper, seeking, hunting, the great, dark heart. It expelled air again. I pulled the lance free to drive it in
again. The beast regarded me. Then it rolled in the water.
“It is dead,� said Imnak.
“How do you know?� I asked.
“The nature of your stroke, and its depth,� said Imnak. “You have penetrated to the heart.�
“Its heart is centered,� I said.
“Consider the blood on your lance,� he said.
I noted it. New blood was splashed more than twenty-eight inches along the shaft.
“You have great strength,� said Imnak. Beasts of Gor, page 285 to 287

Snow Sleen

The young are commonly white furred at birth, the fur darkening by the following spring. Snow sleen, however, remain white-pelted throughout
their life. Slavegirl of Gor, page 185
In this punishment, the girl, clothed or unclothed, is bound tightly on am oar, hands behind her, her head down, toward the blade. When the oar
lifts from the water she gasps for breath, only in another moment to be submerged again. A recalcitrant girl may be kept on the oar for hours.
There is also, however, some danger in this, for sea sleen and the white sharks of the north occasionally attempt to tear such a girl from the oar.
When food is low it is not unknown for the men of Torvaldsland to use a bond-maid, f one is available on a ship, for bait in such a manner. The
least pleasing girl is always used. This practice, of course, encourages bond-maids to vie vigorously to please their masters. An Ahn ion the oar is
usually more then sufficient to make the coldest and proudest of females an obedient, eager-to-please bond-maid. It is regarded as second only
to the five-lash Gorean slave whip, used in the south, and what among men of Torvaldsland is called the whip of the furs, in which the master, with
his body, incontrovertibly teaches the girl her slavery. Marauders of Gor, page 66
In the north, I am told the snow sleen has been domesticated. The sleen is a dangerous and fairly common animal on Gor, which has adapted
itself to a variety of environments. There is even an aquatic variety, called the sea sleen, which is one of the swiftest and most dreaded beasts in
the sea. Sea sleen are found commonly in northern waters. They are common off the coast of Torvaldsland, and further north. Slavegirl of Gor,
page 185


Forest and Prairie Sleen

Even past me there thundered a lumbering herd of startled, short-bunked kailiauk, a stocky, awkward ruminant of the plains, tawny, wild, heavy,
their haunches marked in red and brown bars, their wide heads bristling with a trident of horns; they had not stood and formed their circle, she's
and young within the circle of tridents; they, too, had fled; farther to one side I saw a pair of prairie sleen, smaller than the forest sleen but quite
as unpredictable and vicious, each about seven feet in length, furred, six-legged, mammalian, moving in their undulating gait with their viper's
heads moving from side to side, continually testing the wind; beyond them I saw one of the tumits, a large, flightless bird whose hooked beak, as
long as my forearm, attested only too clearly to its gustatory habits; I lifted my shield and grasped the long spear, but it did not turn in my
direction; it passed, unaware; beyond the bird, to my surprise, I saw even a black larl, a huge catlike predator more commonly found in
mountainous regions; it was stalking away, retreating unhurried like a king; before what, I asked myself, would even the black larl flee; and I asked
myself how far it had been driven; perhaps even from the mountains of Ta-Thassa, that loomed in this hemisphere, Gor's southern, at the shore
of Thassa, the sea, said to be in the myths without a farther shore. Nomads of Gor, page 2
As we passed among the wagons I leaped back as a tawny prairie sleen hurled itself against the bars of a sleen cage, reaching out for me with its
sic-clawed paw. There were four other prairie sleen in the cage, a small cage, and they were curling and moving about one another, restlessly,
like angry snakes. They would be released with the fan of darkness to rum the periphery of the herds, acting, as I have mentioned, as shepherds
and sentinels. They are also used if a slave escapes, for the sleen is an efficient, tireless, savage, almost infallible hunter, capable of pursuing a
scent, days old, for hundreds of pasangs until, perhaps a month later, it finds its victim and tears it to pieces. Nomads of Gor, page 28
Gray Sleen
"Keep your legs apart," he said. "It is a gray sleen. I raised it from a whelp. Ah, greetings, Borko! How are you, old fellow!
I would have screamed and reared up, but I was thrust back, helpless, half strangled, scarcely able to utter a sound, to the step. So our masters
can control us by our collars. To my terror, then, pushing over my body, to thrust its great jaws and head, so large I could scarcely have put my
arms around them, into the hands and arms of my master, was an incredible beast. It had an extremely agile, active, sinuous body, as thick as a
drum, and perhaps fourteen or fifteen feet long. It might have weighed a thousand pounds. Its broad head was triangular, almost viperlike, but it
was furred. This thing was a mammal, or mammalian. Its eyes now had pupils like slits, like those of a cat in sunlight. So quickly then might its
adaptive mechanisms have functioned. About its muzzle were gray hairs, grayer than the silvered gray of its fur. It had six legs.
"Good lad!" said my master, roughly fondling that great, fierce head. Dancer of Gor, page 160
Domestic Sleen
Let her stay in the marshes until she had had her pretty fill, and then let her crawl whimpering back to the portals of the house of Bosk, whining
and scratching like a tiny domestic sleen for admittance, to be taken back! Hunters of Gor, page 12
Miniature  Sleen
To be sure, at that time, I did not know about the miniature, silken sleen that are sometimes kept as sinuous pets. Dancer of Gor, page167

"Don't you really think so? What self-respecting rapist or slaver would be abroad at this hour? What would he expect to find? A miniature domestic
sleen among the garbage cans?" Mercenaries of Gor, page 407


General

Panther girls are arrogant. They live by themselves in the northern forests, by hunting, and slaving and outlawry. They have little respect for
anyone, or anything, saving themselves and, undeniably, the beasts they hunt, the tawny forest panthers, the swift, sinuous sleen. Hunters of
Gor, page 28

Conspicuously absent in the rain forests of the Ua were sleen. This is just as well for the sleen, commonly, hunts on the first scent it takes upon
emerging from its burrow after dark. Moreover it hunts single-mindedly and tenaciously. It can be extremely dangerous to men, even more so, I
think, than the Voltai, or northern, larl. I think the sleen, which is widespread on Gor, is not found, or not frequently found, in the jungles because
of the enormous rains, and the incredible dampness and humidity. Perhaps the sleen, a burrowing, furred animal, finds itself uncomfortable in
such a habitat. Explorers of Gor, page 312
The Kajirae
The Free Women