The Plains of Gor
The Animals
The Warriors
BOSK

The bosk, without which the Wagon Peoples could not live, is an oxlike creature. It is a huge, shambling animal, with a thick,
humped neck and long, shaggy hair. It has a (page 5) wide head and tiny red eyes, a temper to match that of a sleen, and two
long, wicked horns that reach out from its head and suddenly curve forward to terminate in fearful points. Some of these horns,
on the larger animals, measured from tip to tip, exceed the length of two spears.

Not only does the flesh of the bosk and the milk of its cows furnish the Wagon Peoples with food and drink, but its hides cover
the domelike wagons in which they dwell; its tanned and sewn skins cover their bodies; the leather of its hump is used for their
shields; its sinews forms their thread; its bones and horns are split and tooled into implements of a hundred sorts, from awls,
punches and spoons to drinking flagons and weapon tips; its hoofs are used for glues; its oils are used to grease their bodies
against the cold. Even the dung of the bosk finds its uses on the treeless prairies, being dried and used for fuel. The bosk is
said to be the Mother of the Wagon Peoples, and they reverence it as such. The man who kills one foolishly is strangled in
thongs or suffocated in the hide of the animal he slew; if, for any reason, the man should kill a bosk cow with unborn young he is
staked out, alive, in the path of the herd, and the march of the Wagon Peoples takes its way over him. Nomads of Gor, page 4-5

The hundred, rather than eight, bosk- that drew his wagon had been unyoked; they were huge, red bosk; their horns had been
polished and their coats glistened from the comb and oils; their golden nose rings were set with jewels; necklaces of precious
stones hung from the polished horns. Nomads of Gor, page 41
Behind them another four haruspexes, one from each People, carried a large wooden cage, made of sticks lashed together,
which contained perhaps a dozen white vulos, domesticated pigeons. Then the women climb to the top of the high sides on the
wagons and watch the war lanterns in the distance, reading them as well as the men. Seeing if the wagons must move, and in
what direction. When the bosk horns sound the women cover the fires and prepare the men's weapons, bringing forth arrows
and bows, and lances. The quivas are always in the saddle sheaths. The bosk are hitched up and slaves, who might otherwise
take advantage of the tumult, are chained.

The Bosk is a large, horned, shambling ruminant of the Gorean plains. It is herded below the Gorean equator by the Wagon
Peoples, but there are Bosk herds on ranches in the north as well, and peasants often keep some of the animals. Raiders of
Gor, page 26

...Wagon Peoples, incidentally, keep a calendar of fifteen moons, named for the fifteen varieties of bosk, and functions
independently of the tallying of years by snow ;...Nomads of Gor, page 12

The wagon of Kutaituchik, called Ubar of the Tuchuks, was drawn up on a large, flat-topped grassy hill, the highest land in the
camp. Beside the wagon, on a great pole fixed in the earth, stood the Tuchuk standard of the four bosk horns. The hundred,
rather than eight, bosk that drew his  wagon had been unyoked; they were huge, red bosk; their horns had been polished and
their coats glistened from the comb and oils; their golden nose rings were set with jewels; necklaces of precious stones hung
from the polished horns. Nomads of Gor, pages 41-42
I noted that the bosk seemed well cared for, and that their coats were groomed, and the horns and hoofs polished. Wearily I
gave the kaiila to one of the guards and mounted the steps of the wagon.  Nomads of Gor, page 278

Kaiila

The mount of the Wagon Peoples, unknown in the northern hemisphere of Gor, is the terrifying but beautiful kaiila. It is a silken,
carnivorous, lofty creature, graceful, long-necked, smooth-gaited. It is viviparous and undoubtedly mammalian, though there is
no suckling of the young. The young are born vicious and by instinct, as soon as they can struggle to their feet, they hunt. It is
an instinct of the other, sensing the birth, to deliver the young animal in the vicinity of game. I supposed, with the domesticated
kaiila, a bound verr or a prisoner might be cast to the newborn animal. The kaiila, once it eats its fill, does not touch food for
several days.

The kaiila is extremely agile, and can easily outmaneuver the slower, more ponderous high tharlarion. It requires less food, of
course, than the tarn. A kaiila, which normally stands about twenty to twenty-two hands at the shoulder, can cover as much as
six hundred pasangs in a single day's riding.

The head of the kaiila bears two large eyes, one on each side, but these eyes are triply lidded, probably an adaptation to the
environment which occasionally is wracked by severe storms of wind and dust; the adaptation, actually a transparent third lid,
permits the animal to move as it wishes under conditions that force other prairie animals to back into the wind or, like the sleen,
to burrow into the ground. The kaiila is most dangerous under such conditions, and, as if it knew this, often uses such times for
its hunt.

The third rider placed himself, reining in suddenly, pulling the mount to its hind legs, and it reared snarling against the bit, and
then stood still, its neck straining toward me. I could see the long, triangular tongue in the animal's head, behind the four rows of
fangs. The rider, too, wore a wind scarf. His shield was red. The Blood People, the Kassars.

I turned and was not surprised to see the fourth rider, motionless on his animal, already in position. The kaiila moves with great
rapidity. The fourth rider was dressed in a hood and cape of white fur. He wore a flopping cap of white fur, which did not conceal
the conical outlines of the steel beneath it. The leather of his jerkin was black. The buckles on his belt of gold. His lance had a
rider hook under the point, with which he might dismount opponents.

The kaiila of these men were as tawny as the brown grass of the prairie, save for that of the man who faced me, whose mount
was a silken, sable black, as black as the lacquer of the shield. Nomads of Gor, page 13-14

I saw the kaiila tense, almost like larls, their flanks quivering, their large eyes intent upon me. I saw one of the long, triangular
tongues dart out and back. Their long ears were laid back against the fierce, silken heads. Nomads of Gor, page 15

I was later to learn that kaiila are trained to avoid the thrown spear. It is a training which begins with blunt staves and progresses
through headed weapons. Until the kaiila is suitably proficient in this art it is not allowed to breed. Those who cannot learn it die
under the spear. Yet, at a close range, I had no doubt that I could slay the beast. As swift as may be the kaiila I had no doubt
that I was swifter. Gorean warriors hunt men and tarts with this weapon. But I did not wish to slay the animal, nor its rider.
Nomads of Gor, page 24

It was probably developed for hunting the tumit, a huge, flightless carnivorous bird of the plains, but the Wagon Peoples use it
also, and well, as a weapon of war.

Warily now the animal began to circle, in an almost human fashion, watching the spear. It shifted delicately, feinting, and then
withdrawing, trying to draw the cast. Nomads of Gor, page 24

He did not buy the kaiila near the wagon of Yachi of the Leather Workers though it was apparently a splendid beast. At one
point, he wrapped a heavy fur and leather robe-about his left arm and struck the beast suddenly on the snout with his right
hand. It had not struck back at him swiftly enough to please him, and there were only four needlelike scratches in the arm guard
before Kamchak had managed to leap back and the kaiila, lunging against its chain, was snapping at him. "Such a slow beast,"
said Kamchak, "might in battle cost a man his life." I supposed it true. The kaiila and its master fight in battle as one unit,
seemingly a single savage animal, armed with teeth and lance. After looking at the kaiila Kamchak visited a wagon where he
discussed the crossing of one of his cows with the owner's bull, in exchange for a similar favor on his own part. Nomads of Gor,
page 170

Sleens

Even past me there thundered a lumbering herd of startled, short-bunked kailiauk, a stocky, awkward ruminant of the plains,
tawny, wild, heavy, their haunches marked in red and brown bars, their wide heads bristling with a trident of horns; they had not
stood and formed their circle, she's and young within the circle of tridents; they, too, had fled; farther to one side I saw a pair of
prairie sleen, smaller than the forest sleen but quite as unpredictable and vicious, each about seven feet in length, furred, six-
legged, mammalian, moving in their undulating gait with their viper's heads moving from side to side, continually testing the wind;
beyond them I saw one of the tumits, a large, flightless bird whose hooked beak, as long as my forearm, attested only too clearly
to its gustatory habits; I lifted my shield and grasped the long spear, but it did not turn in my direction; it passed, unaware;
beyond the bird, to my surprise, I saw even a black larl, a huge catlike predator more commonly found in mountainous regions; it
was stalking away, retreating unhurried like a king; before what, I asked myself, would even the black larl flee; and I asked myself
how far it had been driven; perhaps even from the mountains of Ta-Thassa, that loomed in this hemisphere, Gor's southern, at
the shore of Thassa, the sea, said to be in the myths without a farther shore. Nomads of Gor, page 2

The vicious, six-legged sleen, large-eyed, sinuous, mammalian but resembling a furred, serpentine lizard, was a reliable,
indefatigable hunter. He could follow a scent days old with ease, and then, perhaps hundreds of pasangs, and days, later, be
unleashed for the sport of the hunters, to tear his victim to pieces. Nomads of Gor, page 105

Physical Traits

It is at night that the sleen hunts, that six-legged, long-bodied mammalian carnivore, almost as much a snake as an animal. I had
never seen one, but had seen the tracks of one seven years before.
I caught a strange, unpleasant scent, much like a common weasel or ferret, only stronger. In that instant every sense was alert.
I froze, an almost animal response.
I was silent, seeking the shelter of stillness and immobility. My head turned imperceptibly as I scanned the rocks and bushes
about the road. I thought I heard a slight sniffling, a grunt, a small doglike whine. Then nothing.
It too had frozen, probably sensing my presence. Most likely it was a sleen; hopefully a young one. I guessed it had not been
hunting me or I would not have been likely to have smelled it. Perhaps I stood thus for six or seven minutes. Then I saw it, on its
six short legs, undulate across the road, like a furred lizard, its pointed, whiskered snout swaying from side to side testing the
wind. Outlaw of Gor, page 34

More on sleens...

Tarsk

“Watch out!� I said.
The tarsk, a small one, no more than forty pounds, tasked, snorting, bits of leaf scattering behind it, charged.
It swerved, slashing with its curved tusks, and I only man. aged to turn it aside with the point of the raider´s spear I carried, one
of four such weapons we had had since our brief skirmish with raiders, that in which we had obtained our canoe, that which had
occurred in the marsh east of Ushindi. It had twisted hack on me with incredible swiftness.
The blond-haired barbarian screamed. I thrust at it again. Again it spun and charged. Again I thrust it back. There was blood on
the blade of the spear and the animal's coat was glistening with it. Such animals are best hunted from the back of kaiila with
lances, in the open. They are cunning, persistent and swift. The giant tarsk, which can stand ten hands at the shoulder, is even
hunted with lances from tarnback.
It snuffled and snorted, and again charged. Again I diverted its slashing weight. One does not follow such an animal into the
bush. It is not simply a matter of reduced visibility but it is also a matter of obtaining free play for one's weapons. Even in the
open, as I was, in a clearing among trees, it is hard to use one's spear to its best advantage, the animal stays so close to you
and moves so quickly. Suddenly it turned its short wide head, with that bristling mane running down its back to its tail. “Get
behind me!� I called to the girl. It put down its head, mounted on that short, thick neck, and, scrambling, charged at the blond-
haired barbarian. She stumbled back, screaming, and, the animal at her legs, fell. But in that moment, from the side, I thrust the
animal from her. It, immediately, turned again. I thrust it again to the side. This time, suddenly, before it could turn again, I, with a
clear stroke, thrust the spear through its thick-set body, behind the right foreleg. I put my head back, breathing heavily.
Explorers of Gor, page 345-346


Tumit

…beyond them I saw one of the tumits, a large, flightless bird whose hooked beak, as long as my forearm, attested only too
clearly to its gustatory habits,…Nomads of Gor, page 2

It was probably developed for hunting the tumit, a huge, flightless carnivorous bird of the plains, but the Wagon Peoples use it
also, and well, as a weapon of war.

Warily now the animal began to circle, in an almost human fashion, watching the spear. It shifted delicately, feinting, and then
withdrawing, trying to draw the cast. Nomads of Gor, page 24

Verr

The verr was a mountain goat indigenous to the Voltai. It was a wild, agile, ill-tempered beast, long-haired and spiral-horn. Priest-
Kings of Gor, page 63


I saw four small milk bosk grazing on the short grass. In the distance, above the acres, I could see mountains, snow-capped. A
flock of verr, herded by a maid with a stick, turned, bleating on the sloping hillside. She shaded her eyes. She was blond; she
was barefoot; she wore an ankle-length white kirtle, of white wool, sleeveless, split to her belly. About her neck, I could see a
dark ring. Marauders of Gor, page 81


In the dafes I had feasted well. I had had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma,
and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg;hot Bazi tea, sugared, and,
later, Turian wine.  Tribesman of Gor, page 47


Clitus, too, had brought two bottles of Ka-la-na wine, a string of eels, cheese of the Verr, and a sack of red olives from the
groves of Tyros.  Raiders of Gor, page 114


In the cafes I had feasted well. I had had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma,
and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg;

Vulo

She was peasant, barefoot, her garment little more than coarse sacking. SHe had been carrying a wicker basket containing
vulos, domesticated pigeons raised for eggs and meat. Nomads of Gor, page 1

I passed fields that were burning, and burning huts of peasants, the smoking shells of Sa-Tarna granaries, the shattered, slatted
coops for vulos, the broken walls of keeps for the small, long-haired domestic verr, less belligerent and sizable than the wild verr
of the Voltai Ranges. Nomads of Gor, page 10

Behind them another four haruspexes, one from each People, carried a large wooden cage, made of sticks lashed together,
which contained perhaps a dozen white vulos, domesticated pigeons. Nomads of Gor, page 175

"Fall to your hands and knees," he said. "Put your bead down." He did so, and I followed his example. To my surprise the five
birds began to circle. I looked up. They were wild vulos, tawny and broad-winged. In a short time they alighted, several yards
from us. They watched us, their heads turned to one side. Hassan began to kiss rhythmically at the back of his band, his head
down, but moving so as to see the birds. The sound he made was not unlike that of an animal lapping water.
There was a squawk as he seized one of the birds which, curious, ventured too near. The other vulos took flight. Hassan broke
the bird’s neck between his fingers and began to pull out the feathers. We fed on meat. Tribesmen of Gor, page 270

I shot the spiced vulo brain into my mouth on the tip of a golden eating prong, a utensil, as far as I knew, unique to Turia.
Nomads of Gor, page 83
The Kajirae
The Free Women